Making Room for Other Roots

Posts tagged with “education”

URGENT STUDENT LOAN QUESTION

adorablebeowulf:

adorablebeowulf:

what are some plausible explanations for my student loan being deferred all the way back to 2017 (I started college in 2011 and took the 2012-2013 year off) that are NOT “I was approved for reduced courseload and took below 12 credits” which is the actual reason why i got deferment

my mother CANNOT know about the fact that i am taking less than 12 credits, but if she is my co-signer (I honestly don’t know) she might find out about the deferment anyway if Fedloan contacts her

I need to know ASAP! I just got the deferment email today.

please help it will be a few hours before my mom wakes up and i am worried she may also get the deferment email

Signal boosting.

via chilbudius 2 months ago link 21 notes #college #education #signal boost #halp plz

medievalpoc:

girlinfourcolors:

fantastic-nonsense:

chicketycheckyourprivilege:

militantweasel:

hauntedmarch:

itsthatawesomeperson:

when will america learn….

We won’t learn, because our education system sucks

Instead of treating kids like machines in a factory, being created into obedient workers. It looks like in Finland they’re treated like actual humans.

it’s also because all teachers there have masters’ degrees, and teaching is seen as a prestigious profession like medicine or law.

What’s actually wrong with American schools is not that they’re not like Finnish schools.
What’s wrong with American schools is that they’re an outdated relic of the early 20th century, where the object was to train a child to have the mindset required to work in a factory job long hours of the day, as at the time that mandatory public school was instituted, that was the main expectation of children.
As the industrial age faded and the US entered the era of private sector jobs, the education system failed to reflect that change, and they’re still training us to have the mindset for an industrial job, not a job in today’s job market.
The problem with American schools is not that they’re not like Finnish schools.
The problem with American schools is that they’re preparing us for jobs that no longer exist.

I keep seeing this reblogged as if that system were ever a good and positive thing for children. The American school system wasn’t designed to prepare young adults to enter the work force as free and independent agents. It was designed to indoctrinate children so that they would not complain about the dangerous, monotonous industrial work ahead of them. It was designed by factory owners with the express purpose of quelling working class revolt before it happened. It was designed to repress individual thinking and to increase dependence. Capitalists watched socialism rising up across the world and they designed American schools to ensure it would not happen here.
You want to know what kind of school you get when you apply that thinking to the modern workplace?

This is an example of a Rocketship school, charter schools that target “primarily low-income students in neighborhoods where access to excellent schools is limited.”
How do parents feel about their children being so excellently prepared for the current job market? See for yourself. These schools prey upon low-income communities, especially in areas with high Latin@/Hispanic populations. They’re becoming increasingly popular because they do exactly what the old industrial schools did: they create a workforce. After you’ve spent thirteen formative years of your life in a call center, after all, what more could you possibly want out of life? 
Education, arts, independent thinking: those things are for rich children. Stop pretending that “being prepared for jobs” is a GOOD thing to do to CHILDREN.

I wanted to share this because I think a lot of people, both inside and outside of the United states, don’t really understand just how bad our education system is, or how it’s been worsening. I’ve literally had people say stuff along the lines of “where do you get these ideas about the education system” or “everyone knows [the content of medievalpoc] so therefore you don’t have a point” (which is super weird, I know, but they still say it).
The financial model and practices for charter schools like Rocketship honestly do not differ greatly from that of say, for-profit prisons. Basically, they’re like a machine with a funnel into which you put human beings in one end, and money comes out the other. What happens to the people is really just a kind of by-product.
It’s no accident that these "schools" target poor communities of color, or that the teachers they employ are often under-qualified.
I don’t know and cannot verify any of the statements in the original graphic above about Finnish schools. What and who I am here for are the people who have received or are in the process of receiving the kind of education described above in the United States. In this kind of environment, in which textbook producers are either willing to literally rewrite history in order to pander to political, social, and financial pressures or are forced to do so, any kind of art history education is viewed as optional, much less the kind of art you see here on medievalpoc, which is rarely seen even among graduate students.
Trying to make counternarratives available to the people disenfranchised by the system-approved dominant narratives (unless you can pay for, have access to, and understand a $200,000 college education, in which case medievalpoc’s topics are considered perfectly legitimate) is as good a description of my goal in curating this blog as any.
None of what I’m describing is a “conspiracy”, other than anything inherently conspiratorial about stating facts on the way things just are. This is my starting point, and this is why I am committed to making the material here as accessible-by anyone!-as possible.

medievalpoc:

girlinfourcolors:

fantastic-nonsense:

chicketycheckyourprivilege:

militantweasel:

hauntedmarch:

itsthatawesomeperson:

when will america learn….

We won’t learn, because our education system sucks

Instead of treating kids like machines in a factory, being created into obedient workers. It looks like in Finland they’re treated like actual humans.

it’s also because all teachers there have masters’ degrees, and teaching is seen as a prestigious profession like medicine or law.

What’s actually wrong with American schools is not that they’re not like Finnish schools.

What’s wrong with American schools is that they’re an outdated relic of the early 20th century, where the object was to train a child to have the mindset required to work in a factory job long hours of the day, as at the time that mandatory public school was instituted, that was the main expectation of children.

As the industrial age faded and the US entered the era of private sector jobs, the education system failed to reflect that change, and they’re still training us to have the mindset for an industrial job, not a job in today’s job market.

The problem with American schools is not that they’re not like Finnish schools.

The problem with American schools is that they’re preparing us for jobs that no longer exist.

I keep seeing this reblogged as if that system were ever a good and positive thing for children. The American school system wasn’t designed to prepare young adults to enter the work force as free and independent agents. It was designed to indoctrinate children so that they would not complain about the dangerous, monotonous industrial work ahead of them. It was designed by factory owners with the express purpose of quelling working class revolt before it happened. It was designed to repress individual thinking and to increase dependence. Capitalists watched socialism rising up across the world and they designed American schools to ensure it would not happen here.

You want to know what kind of school you get when you apply that thinking to the modern workplace?

This is an example of a Rocketship school, charter schools that target “primarily low-income students in neighborhoods where access to excellent schools is limited.”

How do parents feel about their children being so excellently prepared for the current job market? See for yourself. These schools prey upon low-income communities, especially in areas with high Latin@/Hispanic populations. They’re becoming increasingly popular because they do exactly what the old industrial schools did: they create a workforce. After you’ve spent thirteen formative years of your life in a call center, after all, what more could you possibly want out of life?

Education, arts, independent thinking: those things are for rich children. Stop pretending that “being prepared for jobs” is a GOOD thing to do to CHILDREN.

I wanted to share this because I think a lot of people, both inside and outside of the United states, don’t really understand just how bad our education system is, or how it’s been worsening. I’ve literally had people say stuff along the lines of “where do you get these ideas about the education system” or “everyone knows [the content of medievalpoc] so therefore you don’t have a point” (which is super weird, I know, but they still say it).

The financial model and practices for charter schools like Rocketship honestly do not differ greatly from that of say, for-profit prisons. Basically, they’re like a machine with a funnel into which you put human beings in one end, and money comes out the other. What happens to the people is really just a kind of by-product.

It’s no accident that these "schools" target poor communities of color, or that the teachers they employ are often under-qualified.

I don’t know and cannot verify any of the statements in the original graphic above about Finnish schools. What and who I am here for are the people who have received or are in the process of receiving the kind of education described above in the United States. In this kind of environment, in which textbook producers are either willing to literally rewrite history in order to pander to political, social, and financial pressures or are forced to do so, any kind of art history education is viewed as optional, much less the kind of art you see here on medievalpoc, which is rarely seen even among graduate students.

Trying to make counternarratives available to the people disenfranchised by the system-approved dominant narratives (unless you can pay for, have access to, and understand a $200,000 college education, in which case medievalpoc’s topics are considered perfectly legitimate) is as good a description of my goal in curating this blog as any.

None of what I’m describing is a “conspiracy”, other than anything inherently conspiratorial about stating facts on the way things just are. This is my starting point, and this is why I am committed to making the material here as accessible-by anyone!-as possible.

(Source: too-awkward-to-live)

via clatterbane 3 months ago link 200,117 notes #education #teaching #society #disability

yesthattoo:

via Kristen, who wrote the text, sharing with permissiom

President Obama is having a Google+ hangout and is taking questions. I submitted this question: “What are you doing to ensure that students with disabilities are safe from restraint and seclusion? Do you support the Keeping All Students Safe Act?”

Please vote it up so that it has a better chance of being seen, thus answered by President Obama. 

https://plus.google.com/106134486284614852510/posts/fbTTfE9Jj4N

via yesthattoo 3 months ago link 50 notes #education #disability #disability rights

U.S. acts to keep minority, disabled students out of jail

(Source: disabilityhistory)


clatterbane:

thewellofmyself:

if your mental health is ruining your education and you know it clap your hands

*CLAP CLAP*

If your education is ruining your mental health, and you know it, clap your hands!

via clatterbane 3 months ago link 294,687 notes #education #school #university

velvetant:

A Principal in 1815, condemning the limitations of ‘modern technology

velvetant:

A Principal in 1815, condemning the limitations of ‘modern technology

(Source: twitter.com)


youneedacat:

flutterflyinvasion:

cheapfilling:

college is catered towards the able bodied and able minded. school applauds people who can stay up all night, skip meals, and work endlessly. that kind of extreme contribution is expected. why are disabled people being squeezed out of academic institutions? why should I feel inferior because of some arbitrary and ridiculous standard?

FUCK.  YES.

I wish I’d thought this way my first time at college.  It could’ve spared me a suicide attempt.  Maybe.  

*offers hugs to all the disabled people who are going through or being pressured to go through college*

Also - our particular method of schooling is not the same as learning.  There are other ways to learn.  A lot of people like to conflate the two.

via youneedacat 3 months ago link 12,987 notes #education #school #college #university #disability #TRUTH

something really infuriating ABA people do

madeofpatterns:

When you try to talk about ABA and why it’s bad, they *always* shift the goalposts and try to say that all teaching or interaction ever is ABA and therefore you can’t object to what they actually DO.

Like, here are things they take credit for:

  • Breaking down tasks into small steps
  • Evaluating what people’s needs are and teaching them based on them
  • Finding what kids care about and using it to make education more interesting for them (although what they mean by this is making absolutely EVERYTHING a kid cares about contingent on their compliance with ABA demands)
  • Teaching people with language disabilities how to use language
  • Focused one-on-one attention aimed at teaching people practical skills

It’s so impossible to cut through. I’m trying to figure out how to explain and lampshade it. But it’s REALLY HARD to write about.

>.<

Most of those things are methods of *teaching* that have been around since looooong before ABA was invented.  (For instance, for most of history before the industrial revolution, focused one-on-one attention aimed at teaching people practical skills was the main method of teaching.)  The idea of break things down into smaller steps, or finding out what kids care about - other people have figured that out too.  So ABA can’t take credit.  ABA seems to be *one* particular type of these methods that is incredibly rigid and bound up with control.

You can have *all* of these without ABA.

>.<

(Source: patternsmaybe)


Suppose my auto-repair man devised questions for an intelligence test. Or suppose a carpenter did, or a farmer, or, indeed, almost anyone but an academician. By every one of those tests, I’d prove myself a moron, and I’d be a moron, too. In a world where I could not use my academic training and my verbal talents but had to do something intricate or hard, working with my hands, I would do poorly. My intelligence, then, is not absolute but is a function of the society I live in and of the fact that a small subsection of that society has managed to foist itself on the rest as an arbiter of such matters.


Isaac Asimov, from What is Intelligence, Anyway? (via eelhound)


straker1980:

Moms & kittens.

via youneedacat 4 months ago link 315,399 notes #cat #cats #mom #parents #learning #education